Location: One Municipal Plaza, Asbury Park, New Jersey 07712Phone: (732) 775-1765Fax: (732) 988-6935 The judge in Asbury Park court is the Honorable Mark T. Apostolou, J.M.C. The Court Administrator is Patricia Green. Asbury Park Police make a large amount of arrests for drug possession, robbery, burglary, assault and DWI. A fair share of traffic and speeding tickets are also issued in Asbury Park.

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Location: 125 Corlies Ave # 2, Allenhurst, NJ 07711Phone: (732) 531-3217Fax: (732) 531-8694 Court is held on the 3rd Thursday of each month. The judge in Allenhurst is the Honorable George Cieri, J.M.C. Allenhurst court hears a fair amount of DWI and traffic matters, such as speeding tickets. Some minor criminal arrests are also made in Allenhurst.

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Location: 1 Colonial Drive, Manchester, NJ 08759Phone: (732) 657-8121 ext. 3407 A large amount of NJ speeding and other traffic tickets are issued in Manchester Township. Manchester Police also make a fair amount of DWI and minor criminal arrests, mostly disorderly persons offenses like harassment. Court is in session the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. Trials are reserved for the 2nd and 4th Wednesday of each month at 9:30 a.m. The judge in Manchester court is the Honorable Daniel F. Sahin, J.M.C. The Court Administrator is Tracy Barcus. Serving as Senior. Deputy Court Administrator is Catherine Smith. Violations Clerks include Sue Donovan and Sandra Brodbeck. The prosecutor is Valter Must, Esq. Although often appearing as prosecutor will be another member of Mr. Must’s firm, including Robert Rothstein, Esq. and Michael Burns. The public defender is Gregory McGuckin, Esq. Directions to Manchester Municipal Court: If using the Garden State Parkway South (GSPS), use Exit 88. Then make a right onto Route 70 West. Continue on Route 70 until the Route 9 overpass. The after passing six (6) Traffic Lights proceed to Colonial Drive and take jug handle onto Colonial. Turn right into second driveway. If using GSPN, better to use Exit 82A, which will put you on Rt. 37 E. Go past Commonwealth Boulevard. Use the “MANCHESTER Water Tower” as your landmark. Make a right onto Colonial Drive exit ramp. Make a right at the stop sign and then left into. If coming East on Route 70, Go through Lakehurst Borough and then proceed to Colonial Drive. Manchester is located in Northern Ocean County. Approximately 40, 000 people call Manchester home. Manchester Township council members include Kenneth H. Vanderziel, Craig Wallis, Brendan Weiner, Warren Reiter, and Frederick F. Trutkoff. Manchester was the tragic site of the 1937 Hindenburg crash.

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Juvenile crime and detention are on the rise across the USA. Reducing crime by teenagers or even younger youth is an important issue. Parents of minors accused of a criminal act should seek qualified legal representation immediately after an arrest. No parent wants to see their child caught in the criminal justice system, and for good reason. Parents with children who are caught in the New Jersey juvenile justice system have difficult decisions to make, and need the assistance of an effective juvenile criminal defense lawyer. When a child’s future hangs in the balance, the quality, experience, and dedication of the attorney managing the case can make a significant difference in the final outcome. Attorney Anthony J. Vecchio is recognized for his passion in protecting the rights of young people caught in the criminal justice system. He represents minors throughout the areas of Freehold, Mt. Laurel, Princeton, Jersey City, Red Bank, Woodbridge and the rest of the state of New Jersey. Juvenile Crime Statistics in New Jersey and Nationwide How does New Jersey fare on the issue of juvenile crime? Statistics for 2015 provided by the Juvenile Justice Commission show that Camden County has the highest rate of juvenile crimes in the state, followed by Union County, Essex County, Atlantic County, Middlesex County, and Passaic Counties. Areas of high population generally have higher rates of juvenile crime. In the juvenile justice system in New Jersey, there are currently 681 young offenders in the system, 71.91 percent of whom are African-American, 17.7 percent who are Hispanic, and 10.11 percent who are white. New Jersey is not alone when it comes to juvenile crime. A report from the NCJJ (National Center for Juvenile Justice) reveals that, juvenile crime has increased 20%  in the past five decades. Over that same period: Delinquency cases involving drug offenses almost doubled; Person offenses increased 72 percent; and Public order cases increased 64 percent. In one recent year, 1,236,200 cases of juvenile crime were reported, with 317,500 involving crimes against a person. The report also recorded 900 criminal homicides, 5,700 forcible rapes, 23,200 robberies, 31, 600 aggravated assaults, and 221,300 simple assaults, with 10,800 other violent sex offenses, and 23,000 other offenses against a person. Property crimes came in at 447,500 incidents in that one year. The Risks for Incarcerated Youth The troubles can continue for youths who are sent to detention centers. A report from the Anne E. Casey Foundation entitled “Maltreatment of Youths in U.S. Juvenile Corrections Facilities” revealed that one in 10 youths in state juvenile detention centers reported being victimized sexually. Maltreatment in New Jersey facilities has been documented since 2000. In one instance, young offenders were held in 23-hour-per-day seclusion. The Juvenile Law Center has described the state’s juvenile correction system as being riddled with “ongoing abuse practices.” Riots have broken out in these detention centers in recent years, posing a serious danger for an incarcerated child. A juvenile detention home in New Jersey is not where you want your child to go. At-risk children deserve to be helped – effectively. The Use of Curfews in New Jersey to Prevent Juvenile Crime Some cities in New Jersey have imposed a youth curfew to try to stem the tide of juvenile crimes in the area. Under curfew laws, violators can be taken into custody and must be released to a guardian, with fines imposed upon repeat offenders. These actions are an effort to reduce juvenile crimes including gang violence, but young people who were in the wrong place at the wrong time can face serious legal problems after an arrest. Detention Alternative Programs for Juvenile Offenders in New Jersey The state has options for at-risk youth that have proven to be effective in assisting young people to get their lives back on track. The Division of Youth and Family Services works with the Youth Advocate Programs called Detention Alternative Programs (DAI). Getting your son or daughter into one of these alterative programs is an option that must be explored immediately after an arrest for a criminal offense. The program focuses on providing a framework of strategies that are geared to help reduce the inappropriate use of secure juvenile detention, while maintaining public safety. Alternatives to secure detention allow a youth facing criminal accusations to be supervised within the community, rather than being held in a detention center. The state of New Jersey has been designated as a national model for the reform of the juvenile detention system. The lawyer representing your child can seek out alternatives to detention through this program. Mr. Vecchio defends minors caught in the justice system, and carefully manages all of the legal issues associated with juvenile detention, juvenile arrests, juvenile court appearances, and every facet of the child interaction with the juvenile justice system for the following crimes: Shoplifting Robbery Assault Delinquency Violent Crimes Governor Christie Signs Bill S2003 August 10th Directly Affecting Juvenile Offenders On August 10th, Governor Chris Christie signed bill S2003, that directly affects how juvenile offenders are tried, sentenced, and confined. It’s most important aspect is that the minimum age in which juveniles can be tried as adults will increase from age 14 to 15.  It will also only allow the most serious offenses to go to adult courts, and keep juveniles out of adult incarceration centers, changing the minimum age from 16 to 18. This bill has many other implications that we will continue to monitor and report on. How Can Juvenile Delinquency be Prevented? Many youths who are caught in the system begin a downward spiral as a result of learning disabilities. These children deserve to be helped. Programs to address these issues while the child is still young are critical to reducing the numbers of at-risk children. Local programs for at-risk youth such as the Second Chance program, providing mentors to help to steer these children down a better path. Early intervention is the most effective way to serve these children, and to assist them to avoid the pattern of delinquency, gang crime, or other types of offenses. New Jersey has many programs that offer group...

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If you are charged with a crime in New Jersey or are seeking an expungement, you may feel some inclination to represent yourself. However, the New Jersey Courts system itself recommends against this practice, as the court system can be highly confusing. To better explain what you should and shouldn’t expect when representing yourself, the New Jersey Courts have created a helpful list. Here are some of the main points I think are important to note. Things you can expect from the court: The court can explain and answer questions about how the court works. The court can tell you what the requirements are to have your case considered. The court can give you some information from your case file. The court can provide you with guidance on how to fill out forms. The court can provide you with samples of court forms that are available. The court can usually answer questions about court deadlines. While the above list seems fairly comprehensive, consider the following points. Things you can’t expect from the court: The court cannot give you legal advice. Only your lawyer can give you legal advice. The court cannot tell you whether or not you should bring your case to court. The court cannot give you an opinion about what will happen if you bring your case to court. The court cannot recommend a lawyer but can provide you with the telephone number of a local lawyer referral service. The court cannot talk to the judge for you about what will happen in your case. The court cannot let you talk to the judge outside of court. The court cannot change an order issued by a judge. When you are facing criminal charges or seeking an expungement, having an attorney on your side can help. For more information about how a New Jersey criminal defense attorney can help you navigate the criminal justice process, contact a New Jersey criminal defense and expungement attorney today.

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will new law put an end to rideshare programs

A newly proposed law has generated quite a bit of controversy here in New Jersey. According to myCentralJersey.com, legislation backed by the New Jersey insurance and taxi industries could bring an end to rideshare programs like Uber. The proposed law would enforce strict regulatory requirements that ridesharing services may be unwilling or unable to meet. As it currently stands, about 7,500 people in New Jersey are making a living or supplementing their income as Uber drivers. The demand for more Uber drivers has risen dramatically in the past few years, fueled in part by the convenience and cost-saving benefits customers routinely receive. If the new law goes into effect, it could drive Uber out of the state, leaving thousands of people without the extra work and many more without this affordable alternative transportation option. What Does the Bill Propose? The synopsis of the bill states it is intended to establish “insurance and safety requirements for companies that use digital network or software application to match passengers with drivers.” Once enacted, the bill would require transportation network companies (TNCs) like Uber, Lyft and Sidecar to: Obtain a permit, issued by the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission, to legally operate within the state. Provide coverage of no less than $250,000 per incident for liability, property damage and uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage, as well as medical coverage for no less than $10,000 per person per incident. Have commercial insurance coverage go into effect from the moment the driver turned on the app, not once a ride request is accepted, as is the current process. Require drivers undergo routine vehicle inspections at least once every other year. Require driver applicants submit to state police criminal background checks and drug testing. Require all drivers display a commercial driver insignia. Verify each driver has a valid license, registration and insurance coverage. Conduct periodic checks into drivers’ records so the company can prohibit drivers from providing transportation to passengers if the check uncovers instances of reckless driving behavior, drunk driving, driving with a suspended license, or other violations. Conduct periodic checks into drivers’ criminal history records so as to prohibit drivers from providing transportation to passengers if the check uncovers a criminal conviction for assault, rape, burglary, kidnapping, robbery, sexual assault or endangering the welfare of a child. Pay the state a fee of 10-cents per passenger transaction. Opposition Uber Is Facing Taxi and limousine drivers in New Jersey are aggressively fighting to get the same regulatory restrictions that apply to their industries imposed on TCNs. Forbes is reporting that Uber has been facing resistance in others area as well: Germany has temporarily banned Uber and stated its drivers would face fines of as much as $323,700 per trip. Hundreds of taxi drivers in Spain opted to strike in protest of unregulated TCNs. In India, three of Uber’s competitors have made claims that Uber is “violating foreign-exchange laws.” If government of Sao Paulo, Brazil chooses to push for the suspension of all Uber services, further legal problems may ensue for the TCN. Uber has also faced cease-and-desist orders in numerous cities throughout the United States, with some local governments being pressured to block Uber operations altogether. While Uber may face even greater resistance in its future, the Forbes article also notes that companies like Uber, Pandora, iTunes, Airbnb and Craigslist are making dramatic changes to the way we, as a society, are able to receive goods and services. The question is, should these companies be regulated by the same rules and restrictions as past companies, or do the times necessitate a change? How the Public Views Uber and Other Digital Mobile Businesses When a recent poll from New Jersey 101.5 asked viewers whether they agreed with actions by NJ lawmakers to require Uber and other digital mobile businesses adhere to insurance and safety requirements, more than 50 percent of those surveyed stated lawmakers should leave these businesses alone. Another 13 percent said Uber, Lyft and other TCNs should be allowed to continue operating, as long as legislation governing their actions was in place. Approximately 28 percent believe ridesharing, digital mobile services of this type should be discontinued. Uber has also made a few recent changes, which Engadget reports were done in the hopes of making riders feel safer and eliciting higher approval for its services. New initiatives, a driver “code of conduct” and Incident Response Teams who will be available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, will hopefully address some of the bad publicity the company faced last year. Widespread Impact If New Legislation Goes Into Effect As the Law Offices of Anthony J. Vecchio are based here in New Jersey, and our primary practice area is DWI law, we are well aware of the widespread impact this new legislation could have should it go into effect. Each day, we fight to defend those accused of driving under the influence. If regulatory restrictions are put in place, it could cause existing and future Uber drivers to unfairly lose their sole income-earning activity. On the other side, those with DWI convictions on their records could lose Uber and other TCNs as their main source of transportation to and from work. Either way, safety for drivers and passengers must remain the primary concern. As long as the two sides can come to an amicable agreement, this does not have to signify the end to rideshare programs such as Uber. Contact the Law Offices of Anthony J. Vecchio today for more information about New Jersey’s new rideshare law. Sources: myCentralJersey: Will legislation put the brakes on New Jersey’s Uber drivers? NJ Spotlight: Uber Tries to Steer Clear of New Rules and Regulations in Garden State New Jersey Legislature: Assembly Bill A-3765 New Jersey 101.5: Should Uber continue in New Jersey? – Poll Forbes: Uber vs. the Law (My Money’s on Uber)

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limits medical malpractice

If you’ve been injured by a mistake made by your doctor, New Jersey law places limits on how long you have to file a medical malpractice lawsuit and on the amount you can recover for your injuries. The law places a time limit on how long you have to file a medical malpractice claim against your doctor. That time limit is referred to as a statute of limitations. Under New Jersey law, you must file your medical malpractice claim within two years of the date your doctor made the mistake that injured you. In some cases, your clock for filing a New Jersey medical malpractice doesn’t start to run when the doctor made the mistake. If you could not have realized that you were injured until some time after the mistake was made, the statute of limitation may not start running until you should have been reasonably aware that a mistake was made. In addition to the time limit for filing a medical malpractice claim in New Jersey, there is also a limit place on how much a plaintiff can be awarded in a medical malpractice case. These limits are called damage caps. Fortunately, only certain types of damages are capped. The primary damages that a plaintiff can receive in a medical malpractice case are compensatory damages. Those damages are generally the cost of your injury. That includes the medical bills resulting from the injuries your doctor caused you. There is no limit on compensatory damages in New Jersey. In addition to the concrete financial injury resulting from your medical bills, a medical malpractice injury typically causes other, less easily measurable, damages. One type of damages falling into this category is non-economic damages. These include, for instance, pain and suffering damages, which compensate you for the physical and emotional pain you suffer as a result of your injuries. Like compensatory damages, non-economic damages are not capped by New Jersey. The last types of damages that can be awarded in New Jersey are punitive damages. These damages are awarded only when a doctor’s behavior is particularly bad. As the name implies, punitive damages don’t necessarily compensate you for your injuries so much as punish the doctor. Punitive damages are limited by New Jersey law to the greater of five times your compensatory damages or $350,000. Contact the Law Offices of Anthony J. Vecchio today to speak with our medical malpractice lawyer.

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stopped by police

Most traffic stops in New Jersey are routine: A police officer puts on the blue lights, and the driver of the other vehicle pulls over. The officer asks for the driver’s license and registration and, perhaps, issues a ticket or warning if a traffic law has been violated. Then, both parties simply go on their way. However, sometimes, the interaction between the officer and the driver being stopped can quickly become contentious. In order to avoid being involved in such a traffic stop and to stay safe in your interaction with a police officer, it is important that you understand your legal rights and your responsibilities. If you are stopped by a police officer in New Jersey, you must provide the officer with: Your name Your driver’s license Your vehicle registration information. However, during a police stop you are not required to: Consent to a search of your vehicle Consent to a search of your person Answer any questions that may be incriminating. (In other words, you have the right to remain silent.) While you have these rights, it is important that you exercise your rights in an appropriate fashion. Do not raise your voice, insult the police officer or object aggressively. You should never show any intent to physically harm a police officer. You should also never make any sudden movements that could be interpreted as reaching for a weapon or attacking an officer. Additionally, you have a right to record a traffic stop. However, be careful if you choose to do so. Waving a camera in a police officer’s face may cause tensions to flare and could be seen by an officer as an act of taunting. The Most Important Rule When Dealing With Police: Stay Polite Being polite is the foundation for a positive interaction with law enforcement. If you get stopped by policre and approaches your window, you should remain calm, cordial and as professional as possible – even though it may be hard to do under the circumstances. If you act polite, it can help to diffuse a potentially heated moment. For example, if a police officer asks you to do something such as putting down your cell phone or stopping smoking, you should simply do so. Harry Houck, who is a retired New York police detective, told CNN that it is best that you comply for your own safety. After the situation is over you may then bring that information to your attorney or file a complaint about the officer. If an officer asks you a question, you may wish to politely respond, “I choose not to answer that question.” If the officer asks for permission to search your car or your person, you could calmly say, “I do not consent to a search of my vehicle.” If you believe that you are being detained for an unreasonable amount of time, you can ask the officer, “Am I free to go?” In short, to the best of your ability, try to control the tone of your interaction with the officer and keep the heat turned down as low as possible. Above all, if you have been stopped by a police officer in New Jersey, then as soon as you are able to do so, contact a criminal defense attorney who will work hard to protect your rights and seek the best possible outcome in your case.

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The Law Offices of Anthony J. Vecchio, LLC is proud to announce that the American Institute of Criminal Law Attorneys™ (AIOCLA) has selected Anthony Vecchio as one of its 10 Best Criminal Law Attorneys for Client Satisfaction in New Jersey for 2015. As a third-party attorney rating organization, the AIOCLA publishes annual lists of the top criminal attorneys in each state. The group’s mission is to provide a resource for potential clients to aid in the process of selecting an attorney. Attorneys can be nominated to the list by clients or peers. However, the selection process is rigorous. The AIOCLA conducts its own independent research to determine qualifications and eligibility. Attorneys must meet the following selection criteria before being considered for inclusion on this list: A 10 out of 10 rating for client satisfaction No negative feedback Top ratings from both clients and legal peers A proven leader in the industry No ethics complaints Awards, associations, publications and speaking engagements Education and commitment to continued education Attorney Vecchio was chosen due to his level of professionalism, performance in the field of criminal law and the sound relationships he has developed with his clients. His reputation for the highest standards of client service and client satisfaction is what places him on this list for criminal attorneys in New Jersey. Who is New Jersey Attorney Anthony Vecchio, Esq.? In addition to his inclusion on the 10 Best list, Anthony Vecchio is an experienced attorney who has handled well over 1,000 criminal, municipal court and appellate cases. He has received a 10.0 Superb rating on Avvo, was included in the National Trial Lawyers – Top 100 Trial Lawyers for 2013, and has been included in the Super Lawyers® Rising Stars℠ Edition of 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015. His past experience as a judicial law clerk to the Honorable Donald G. Collester, Jr., J.A.D., retired and with the New Jersey Superior Court, Appellate Division has given him insight into how the legal and court systems function. As an attorney who has both prosecuted and defended, Vecchio knows both sides of the criminal law process in the courtroom and behind the scenes in negotiations. That knowledge aids him in developing a defense for his clients. Criminal Defense Legal Representation in New Jersey Finding yourself in need of legal assistance can be an extremely frightening situation. Having an aggressive advocate on your side who is willing to fight for your rights can make all the difference in the success or failure of your case. If you are in need of legal representation in New Jersey, Vecchio’s practice is focused on providing counsel to those facing charges of a criminal nature, DWI, traffic violations, and juvenile crimes, as well representation in cases of personal injury. He personally handles each case he takes on and is committed to protecting the rights of his clients and pursuing a positive case outcome for them. If you are in need of legal representation, contact us at one of our six locations across New Jersey in Freehold, Mt. Laurel, Jersey City, Red Bank, Princeton, or Woodbridge.

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A deadly car accident in nearby Paterson, New Jersey has left behind two fatalities and two badly injured people, along with many more questions. While investigators piece together the cause of the wreck, speculation about either drivers’ intoxication as well as questions about slippery road conditions continue by the grieving family and friends of those involved. If your family has suffered a loss due to the negligence of another person, the Law Offices of Anthony J. Vecchio, LLC wants you to know that you don’t have to struggle through the legal system alone. We are here to assist in your time of loss. You have legal rights under New Jersey’s Wrongful Death Act as well as under the state’s intestacy (or probate) laws. The United States Dept. of Justice (DOJ) created this informative chart intended to help families understand some facts about victim compensation in New Jersey. When a family member dies at the hand of another person, the surviving family is entitled to compensation. But you may not know that the compensation is not equally divided among the relatives. So what are the laws determining how much each person receives? When someone dies without first creating a will, we say that person died intestate. New Jersey’s intestacy laws determine the priority by which the probate court distributes that person’s estate, and it all depends on family relationships. For example, if the intestate person was married at the time of his or her death, the spouse inherits everything. The DOJ’s chart explains when the deceased leaves a spouse and children, the “spouse takes the first $50,000 plus half of the balance of the estate if the children are also the spouse’s. If they are not, spouse only take half of the estate. Remainder is divided equally among the children in the same generation.” These are just two examples of ways the intestacy rules work in New Jersey. When we’re dealing with a wrongful death lawsuit, any compensation recovered for pain and suffering, including loss of companionship, loss of parental guidance, and loss of domestic help, will be divided according to the intestacy rules (as incorporated into the Wrongful Death and Survival Statutes). For more information on your rights surrounding a wrongful death claim, contact an experienced New Jersey wrongful death attorney.

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